The tempe(h)rature’s rising!

No, really. I’ve tasted a lot of different tempeh over the years, With varying degrees of luck. Some are just plain bitter and don’t taste good at all, some are OK, especially if they’re marinated and fried well. But that’s all tempeh’s ever been to the both of us: OK.

Until we decided to make it ourselves.

Gunnar’s now so smitten with it, he eats it daily – even raw, meaning without any seasoning or marinade whatsoever. And the kids? They went from not even being able to handle the smell, to eating it with joy and great appetite. So: is the difference between store-bought and homemade tempeh really THAT big? Apparently, yes. So we’re gonna go ahead and share our recipe for tempeh. It’s really easy to make, but it takes some time. It has to ferment for three days and nights (allthough we usually get away with just two). At the same time, don’t you just love food that makes itself while you can spend some time around the house? A hot tip: Make a lot and freeze them. We guarantee you you’ll need them. Once you go homemade tempeh, you’ll never go back.

Du har ikke smakt tempeh før du har smakt hjemmelaget tempeh!

They're sooo ready for being consumed!
3 regular soybean tempeh and 2 chick pea tempeh. The chick pea tempeh was not a success. I’m not sure why, but we ended up throwing it away. The soybean tempeh, however, got us all hooked.
The tempe(h)rature's riiising!
Soybean tempeh, sliced up nice, marinated in soy sauce, ketchup and loads of spices before taking a serious fry in the frying pan. YUM!

Ingredients for about 2-3 tempeh blocks:

  • 2 cups of dry soy beans
  • 1/2 tsp tempeh starter (google it, I buy it online)
  • 3 tbsp apple cider vinegar
  • 2 – 3 ziplock bags

 

This is how you do it:

Place the soy beans in a bowl with enough water to cover them and then some, remember they double in size overnight. Let them sit there until the next day.

Drain and rinse the beans and boil them in fresh water until they are almost done (about 1 hour, they should be soft but not too soft).

Add the apple cider vinegar into the beans and let them boil for another 15-20 minutes. Drain the beans and put them back into the casserole. There should be no water left, but don’t let them be too dry either. Cool the beans until they are at room temperature ( so the heat doesn’t kill the tempeh starter).

Add the starter and stir it in real good.

Take out the ziplock bags. Use a fork or something pointy and make 4-6 holes in the bags, right through them (holes on both sides).

Put the beans in the bags, they should be full. Make a rectangle, it should be quite firm. Place the blocks in a dehydrator at 40 degrees, or in an incubator or in the oven at  with only the light turned on. For best result, place something heavy on top of the blocks. For instance a wooden board with books/casseroles etc on top.

Let them sit here for about24 to 48 hours. It’s easy to see when they are done, they are white all over (mould, this is really healthy).

Put them in the fridge or freezer and put them in cubes into casseroles, or fry them with marinade/spices etc. Delicious!

 

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.